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is necessary and imperative to sway the doubtful. if you don't dot numbers you won't succeed. the two men together succeeded. >> we're speaking with forking and the comprise of the union. thank you. .. >> host: we are here today to talk about your book, "that's not what they meant" reclaiming the founding fathers from america's right wing. how has america's right-wing claimed the founding fathers? >> guest: well i think the founding fathers are part of the wilderness in america and we all claim them for a lot of different political points. i think that in the current historical moment, the right-wing has done two things that i find a little bit disturbing. one is they have collected fight the founding fathers and created a sort of collective single entity, a high mind founding father and they have attributed a whole lot of things that one or two people during the founding generation believed to this collective mind. then they have used it to try to say this is what our founders believed. certain opinions are illegitimate and cannot be entertained. and have used that founding -- and i thin
were fanatics. you don't hear about the russian side of an you don't hear about the other choices that could be had. >> this book stirred up a controversy and expected it to. i wonder if we get into some of the areas coming in, historians like to argue about and that have already elicited commentary on different sites. the cold war, is what you're writing about here, and to the film. and perhaps as i alluded you argue so much is the trend is primarily to blame for the beginning of the cold war, that stalin and the soviets would've been, would've been opened and were welcoming the wartime alliance between the two countries. but it was american action primarily with some allies, british, for example. is that an accurate -- >> i would say that is accurate. we certainly don't consider stalin is blameless in all of us. we certainly don't downplay stalin's brutality or the terrible things that were done in the name of the soviet union under stalin's leadership. that's important a factor in. if we look at the broad sweep of the history, beginning in 1917, 1918 when the tray first sent tr
. >> guest: we don't have much information about it. we do know that howard hung out with some radical minded fellow teenagers in replan and that he was influenced by them. we know that a couple of them were even in the communist party howard was not, he was never an ideologue of any kind in fact. he was influenced by them, influenced by his own life circumstances. one day there was a demonstration called for times square. we don't even know what it was about. we do know that howard went along lead to have the police mounted on horseback charged into the crowd. howard get popped on the head and will up hours later in the doorway, and the protest had long since ended. >> host: know, as a few years later fascism became a big part of his political identity. a lot of his friends thought the second world war was a battle of various imperialists. howard thought that it was a very serious thing. in fact, wanted to be in the war. we talk about how he got vault -- involved. >> guest: he volunteered. he felt very strongly about fascism. i was surprised given the fact that has he had been somewhat radic
of books available and if stores like the still stores like this don't survive then there won't be books readily available for the public. as the book business continues to change i would like to be able to persevere and stay here for the indefinite future. .. >> host: well, martin, i'm very pleased to be with you to talk to you about your new book. >> guest: thank you. >> host: now, you've written a number of biographies other the course of your career, and i wanted to ask if you felt this was a different sort of project than the other ones or whether you approached it differently? what were the reasons that you decided to write this book? >> guest: i knew howard somewhat. we were never close friends, but i did know him. and when he died, i had the thought that i might well be the right person, because we shared a lot of of political values in common. and i always liked him very much as a human being. so i talked to the family, and the archives were all unprocessed, but they were willing to let me in to rumble around. and i did that for a couple of years. [laughter] and i think the real
. >> yes, we don't have much information about it. it's fairly fuzzy, but we do know that he hung out with some radical minded fellow teenagers in brooklyn and that he was influenced by them. we know that a couple of them where even in the communist party. howard was not, he was never an ideal of of any kind but he was influenced by them and by his own circumstances, and one day they went to times square and we don't even know where the conversation was about but we do know that howard went along only to have the police mounted on horseback charging through the crowd, and he got bought on the head and he woke up hours later in a doorway at the march or the protest had long since ended. >> now, a few years later and i fascism became a big part of his political identity and in fact also a love of his friends thought at the second world war in a sort of battle of variant dim eikenberry as imperialists he felt the fascism was a very serious thing and in fact wanted to be in the war. can you talk about how he got involved? >> well, he actually volunteered. she did feel as you say very stro
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5